DEMOCRACY WITHOUT OPPOSITION – WHAT IS TO BE DONE?

British parliamentary democracy now runs without opposition. The centre-left, the main population constituency, is without representation. This is the time to bite the bullet and form a new political party. An opposition could be in place in time for the next election.

The Brexit upheaval has shifted the political landscape. The Conservative Party is in power with no threat to its dominance. The Labour Party is disintegrating and no longer has the force of a possible alternative government. The Scottish nationalists are trouble, but do not represent an opposition. An electoral democracy does not function without a credible opposition.

There are two possible routes to the reconstitution of an opposition. One is to form a coalition of opposing parties that could speak with collective strength in Parliament and collaborate at the next election to maximise the number of joint MPs. That would have to be between the Labour Party and the Liberal Democrats, possibly joined by the Greens. Plans are circulating in Westminster for some kind of coalition but are not finding takers in the relevant parties and their leaderships.

The other possibility is more radical and based on a more radical analysis of the Labour Party’s predicament. It is assumed that the Labour Party is not in a temporary difficulty because of bad leadership but in irreparable decline because its time in history is up. It served the country magnificently with the great reforms after the Second World War, but has since run out of both mission and base in the transition to global capitalism and the withering of the working class. To the question of what the Labour Party is now for, no one has an answer, least of all the Party’s own leadership. This came on dramatic display in the referendum campaign, to which Labour had hardly any contribution to make. In this analysis, the Labour Party will never again represent a credible alternative government.

Since an opposition is needed, it must be recreated. The time is right for the formation of a new party of the centre-left. This should bypass both Labour and the LibDems, both spent forces without ability to renewal, and start from scratch.

A new party should have a platform of three pillars. First, social justice. The Brexit vote (as with the Trump vote in America and populism in Europe) came out of justified anger against the destructions to the social fabric from the extremes of inequality and neglect resulting from globalisation, automation and economic crisis. As we after WWII found ways of sharing the fruits of industrial capitalism, we must now find the recipe for fairness under post-industrial capitalism.

Second, environmental protection and responsible husbandry. The preservation of the earth – its resources, species and natural environment – must be pulled into the centre ground of national and international public policy.

Third, constitutional reform. The Brexit process, from the announcement of the referendum, through its campaign and execution to now its follow up, and other events such as the Chilcot Report on Britain’s participation in the Iraq war, have revealed that we do not have a safe system of political decision-making.

There are various groupings and initiatives that could form the nucleus of a new centre-left party. One is the Green Party, which has already had the success of achieving Parliamentary representation in spite of a hostile system of elections. It is a small force but on the right side of history.

A second relevant initiative, again on the right side of history, is the Women’s Equality Party. This, again, is presently not a strong force, but is an avant guarde in innovative thinking about social justice under new circumstances. Their take is obviously a feminist perspective, which must be central in a new politics of justice, but firmly grounded in a reflection of social justice more generally.

A third relevant initiative is the Constitution Reform Group, an initiative of concerned citizens with broad societal and political experience, constituted as an ideas factory for constitutional improvements. The group has published, most centrally, a draft Act of Union Bill with a new settlement for the regions of the United Kingdom, broadly federal in nature, with consistent devolution from London to all of the regions and hence a new system of governance with shared authorities between Parliament in London and the regions.

There are many other groups and initiatives, not least at the neglected local level, that could join in the deliberation on how to meet the challenge of opposition in a new political landscape, if only an initiative of catalyst could start the process. Let this be a challenge to the groupings mentioned to make themselves that catalyst. It is much to ask. All of them are no doubt happy with their current circumstances and all of them would fear the ugly necessity of compromising their purity if they were to join up with others in collaborative action. But political Britain needs opposition and is not getting it from present political constellations.